Washington’s New Distressed Property Law (1)

HB2791, entitled “Property Conveyances — Distressed” becomes effective June 12 and this prospect is causing concern and confusion in the residential real estate industry. Memos are flying around real estate agencies and you hear occasional cries of doom from bleak Cassandras and doleful Jeremiahs The law is not complex, so reasonably diligent agents and others in the field should at least not be confused. Furthermore, the law will not entrap any reasonably well intentioned and informed person in the future. It should, however, dramatically reduce pandemic fraud.

First, it applies to contracts signed after June 12. Any pending unconscionable equity skimming transactions, while not subject to the terms of the new law, should be abandoned in some sensible fashion, however, because of common law and statutory liability that predates SB 2791. (I have several of these lawsuits brought by deceived homeowners under the previously existing law.)

I often hear that this new law does far more harm than good because it scares aware legitimate foreclosure rescue investors. The homeowners will be tied to the tracks of nonjudicial foreclosure procedure and left destitute and homeless. That of course is exactly where these equity skimming schemes leave people. I have been involved with these for a few years now and I have yet to meet a homeowner who cliamed to have benefitted by an equity skimming arrangement, and I have heard of only one family that came out of it with their home. They lost all their equity and could barely make the payments on their heavily encumbered house but they last I heard still had it.

What is not spoken of much is that part of the scam is to convince homeowners not to legitimate alternatives to avoid the foreclosure. First, people can sell their houses and buy new ones, using the equity from the sale. They can also resort to bankruptcy to sell the house or reorganize their debts. That after all is why bankruptcy courts were created. Also a foreclosure slae does not mean that the homwowner will necessarily be left penniless.

Equity skimming is generally done by people who cannot afford to bid at a foreclosure sale and who want to get homes more cheaply than they would if they could afford to bid at a foreclosure sale.

Recently prices of homes being sold at foreclosure sales, because of competitive bidding, were about 60% on average of fair market value. The difference between the balance on the mortgage being foreclosed and the foreclosure slaes price would go to the homeowner. If not it went to pay secured debt that would have followed the homeowner after the foreclosure. So usually the homeowner would be in better financial shape with a foreclosure than by falling into one of the equity skimming schemes.

Sincere investors who really wanted to help the homeowners would just have to loan them the money to bring the mortgage currently, typically $8,000 to $20,000, and take a second mortgage at a profitable interest rate. Very simple and straight forward. Equity skimmers are after extravagant profit at the expense of distressed homeowners.

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2 Responses to Washington’s New Distressed Property Law (1)

  1. Tony Orlando says:

    I’ve been reading along for a while now. I just wanted to drop you a comment to say keep up the good work.

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