Water Rights: Let the Buyer Beware.

November 4, 2014

Water rights issues are cropping up with increasing frequency as water becomes a diminishing commodity. In the Puget Sound area this is a somewhat ironic concept, as flooding seems to have been on the uptick and the drizzle for which the area is renown has certainly not disappeared. Flooding however is often attributed to logging and development which causes rainwater to become surface water, rather than groundwater, available through wells. The expansion of the population beyond areas served by water systems has created a proliferation of wells, drawing from largely unknown underground estuaries. This increased burden on the supply of water diminishes the quantity of water available to wells, sometimes with disastrous results.

Care must be taken when purchasing water rights or acquiring property with water rights. The value of property is often dependent on water rights but too often property is purchased without a thorough investigation of those water rights. Scrutiny of a title report may give the buyer false confidence in the availability of water.

In verifying the validity of a water source the inquirer enters into the Byzantine realm of Washington water rights, which defy easy explanation. Broadly speaking there are three levels of inquiry. First water systems must be permitted by the State Department of Ecology. However, there are certain exemptions from state permitting requirements and water systems that predate the water code of 1917 need not be permitted. Roughly 166,000 systems claim to have originated before 1917 but very few claims, if any, have been adjudicated. Next the county determines compliance with health requirements and conducts routine inspections. This is usually a fairly straight forward inquiry for the purchaser.

The last common level of inquiry relates to the assignment of water rights. The right to draw water is assignable. As to any water source that is off-site, the validity of the transfer of water rights must be verified. If there is a well on site, all documents transferring rights to others, or allocating rights of use, must be verified. When creating a joint-use well a great deal of difficulty can be avoided by carefully delineating each user’s rights and duties. This warrants as much care as the determination of the rights and regulations governing a home owners’ association.

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Environmentalism and the Nazis

June 22, 2008

In the 1950’s communists were said to be infiltrating the government and the entertainment industry, as well as operating under several fronts. The McCarthy era ended when the demagoguery was challenged and the true charlatans were identified. While it lasted, though, it was a ticket to political prominence.

In the last few years some people have taken to identifying environmentalists as Nazis. This is actually done on national television and similar venues; we have almost grown to expect it in political campaigns. Such fear and hate mongering seems to be efficacious. You would think that it would backfire, but there must be more people swayed by it than repulsed.

On national media in 2006 Al Gore was compared to Nazi propagandist Goebbels and to Hitler for his success in publicising global warming. (It is a bit ironic that the people who diminish the Holocaust in this way tend to be Israel’s most zealous supporters.) On CNN Senator Inhofe actually described Gore’s testimony to the Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Utilities in that manner with the concurrence of Glenn Beck, the host.

In 2007 Fox News Radio continued the Gore/Hitler diatribe. CNN continued to transmit unbelievable comparisons to Hitler and Nazis. Glenn Beck recently said that Gore’s global warming campaign is like Hitler’s use of eugenics to justify exterminating 6 million European Jews.

With the new report on global warming just out, a report subscribed to about a dozen scientific groups associated with our government, doesn’t this treatment of science remind you of earlier, more primitive, periods of history?  Imagine: A world wide scientific conspiracy.  Really?

The hate and fear mongering diatribes are uniformly nothing more than name calling. There is no real rebuttal. Scientists picked “An Inconvenient Truth” apart pretty thoroughly finding some questionable facts and theatrics that suggested an unsupported conclusion. A UK judge found nine factual errors in the film.

But scientists and the British judiciary (one member anyway) agree that the film is rooted in good science and its overall message is supported by sound scientific theory and belief. This was known in 2007 and then Gore got a Nobel Peace Prize along with a U.N. panel of scientists investigating global warming. This, if anything, seemed to fan the flames of hate mongers.

This very odd discourse about environmentalism is probably the progeny of a pseudo-intellectual eddy in revisionist history. People are actually positing that environmentalism is a Nazi program, sort of like “Boys from Brazil.” This theory has been debunked by legitimate historians and even the people who are credited with originating this view disclaim any association with it.

A couple of years ago Jonah Goldberg’s book “Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning” appeared. This book seemed to revitalize the “environmentalism is fascism” diatribe, although Goldberg claimed to have written nothing that was intended to suggest such a thing. The book sold well to mixed reviews. It was celebrated by conservative reviewers and panned by others.

The book’s thesis, behind all the pseudo-intellectual blather, is essentially Libertarian: Fascism means governmental regulation and liberalism means governmental regulation; therefore liberalism is fascist. Environmentalists want governmental regulation therefore they are fascists too. For proof just look at Nazi Germany where environmentalism was born. Nazis called themselves the national socialist party therefore socialists are fascists. Socialists are liberals. Very simple-minded stuff hiding in a lot of jargon.

This silly word parsing though unhinges people like those at the Building Industry Association of Washington who have made a habit of labeling anyone opposing their views as Nazis. In March their newsletter, in addition to more conventional name calling, called the Washington State Department of Ecology Nazis and lumped all environmentalists under that moniker.

This set off a local firestorm culminating in and Anti Defamation League demand for a retraction or apology. The B.I.A.W. of course refuses claiming the article (written by its storm drain columnist) is academically grounded. The B.I.A.W. is widely regarded as the Washington State Republican Party’s attack dog and neither the party nor any of its candidates has attempted to separate from this absurd propaganda machine.