Washington State Republican Party Caught Breaking Campain Laws

October 2, 2008

When it rains it pours. I’ve discussed the two lawsuit filed by the Attorney General’s office against the Master Builders Association of King County and Snohomish County and agains a BIAW subsidiary. These suits related to allegedly illegal campaign contributions to Republican causes and recently there has been some discussion in the Seattle P.I. linking Dino Rossi, the Republican candidate for governor, to these events.

The State Republican Party (remember them, the ones who in their platform propose to disregard the 14th Amendment) has also recently suffered at the hands of the Public Disclosure Commission regarding campaign contributions. On September 25 the Commission heard a case entitle Washington State Republican Party, Case # 09-015.

The case relates to three letters sent out by the party during the primary season, scurrilously attacking Gregoire and recommending Rossi. The cost of these mass mailings was not reported by the party in the manner required by the law according to the Commission.

The Washington State Republican Party claimed that the communications were exempt, which seems like quite a stretch. The argument seems to be based on RCW 42.17.640(b) which exempts internal communications not associated with an individual candidate.

There were two big problems: it is hard to imagine how mass mailings are “internal” and the letters clearly favored Dino Rossi.

The party argued that the mailings went out to Republicans only, which is a challenging argument since Republicans do not register here. There was difficulty arguing that the mailings were not associated with Rossi.   Assuming that the party knew the law (which may be a significant assumption), my impression was that its behavior was based on not getting caught rather than having a solid legal justification for its actions.

The Commission had no problem finding that the party had violated the law, voting 4-1 to send the matter to the Attorney General to review commencing a lawsuit. The decision is reported here.

What interested me was the lone dissenting vote, cast by Jim Clements, a former Republican legislator. He said that he did not dispute the Commission’s conclusion but that these things are “sometimes more political than substance,” so he voted that there had been no violation of the law.

I hope there was an error in reporting because that is complete nonsense. He agrees with the majority but votes against it for purely political reasons based on speculation. His job is to enforce the law and he apparently would give a pass to illegal campaigning until after elections?

I hope that Rob McKenna recuses himself for a conflict of interest on this one. He declined to do so in the lawsuits previously mentioned. Here the conflict of interest seems so strong it could not be ignored.

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The Washington Primaries

August 25, 2008

I’ll write more later but first a couple of quick comments on the primary results. Sam Reed, the Secretary of State was the pronounced favorite, which I thought was encouraging. Mr. Reed is the traditional sort of Republican, the Dan Evans sort of politician who subordinates party interest to public interest.

He is competent, ethical and trustworthy. He does not bow to the extremists who have taken over the state Republican party, people who seem to profess winning at any cost.

Our local Republican Party of course suffers from a disregard of the Constitution in its zeal to win, advocating the disregard of the 14th Amendment in its just adopted platform. It has been lock step with the Bush Administration in its position on FISA and the Administration’s disregard of the the 4th Amendment. The party sanctions the hate-politics of its attack dog the B.I.A.W. Sam Reed is cut out of better cloth.

The Attorney General’s race between the incumbent and John Ladenburg could not present more divergent styles. Our current Attorney General campaigns on tort reform using misleading statistics, then argues against this in politically popular cases such a Exxon Valdez, when political pressure mounted for a distressed property law here, he proposed legislation, then argued to the real estate special interests that the legislature was to blame for being overly protective.

Our Attorney General seems to be trying to appeal to everyone, while maintaining his corporate base and receiving substantial corporate donations.

His deficiencies as Attorney General are compensated for by adroit political maneuvering. He has launched, as of a few months ago, an email campaign, publicizing the “successes” of his office. This seems to me to be a highly questionable use of public funds.

John Ladenburg on the other hand is an adept administrator with a commendable track record as Executive of Pierce County. His rather low key style has served to resolve problems and issues that the incumbent uses to factionalize the electorate and drive people apart.